Saturday, October 6, 2018

Weekly Update: September Snapshot

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Friend-

Congress accomplished a great deal of work this September. We passed landmark legislation to combat the opioid crisis. We also sent a government funding bill to the President's desk that delivers on-time, reliable funding for our military for the first time in a decade. These resources will allow our service members to meet current national security threats and plan for the future. 

The House also took the first step to build on the incredible economic growth we've seen this year by passing Tax 2.0. This bill would make the tax cuts for working-class families and small businesses permanent, promote family savings, and spur new business innovation. 

When I wasn't in Washington working on these critical issues, I was out and about in the First District continuing my work to expand access to rural broadband, promote key workforce development programs, and ensure our service members have the tools they need. Check out some of the visits I had this past month below:


The Greater Williamsburg Ducks Unlimited Chapter held its 14th Annual Fall Event, where I joined some area Greenwings in activities including coloring, decoy painting, calling tips, and dog handling. Today's youth are the conservationists of tomorrow. 
 

I stopped by Modern Day Marine at MCB Quantico to speak with some our service members.

         

I spoke at the National Wildlife Refuge Expo about how I worked across the aisle with Rep. Hakeem Jeffries (D-NY) to pass the Keep America's Refuges Operational Act that authorizes the volunteer programs critical to keeping our refuges up and running. 
 

I dropped off some school supplies and visited with teachers and school officials at Rosa Parks Elementary in Woodbridge.

I spoke with folks at the Prince William County Chamber of Commerce about the strength of our economy. From record low levels of unemployment to rising wages to record high consumer confidence, the polices this Congress has put in place are working.

I received the Guardian of Small Business Award from the National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB). Virginia's First District has a plethora of small businesses that are critical to the health of our economy, and I'm proud to fight for the policies that help them succeed. 

I toured Diaz Foods Distribution center in Manassas to hear about the role tax reform has played in their business.


I spent an evening with International Association of Fire Fighters Local 3886 to celebrate their 20th anniversary and thank them for their service to our community. 

I joined the Fredericksburg Regional Chamber of Commerce to talk about ways Congress can work alongside states and localities to eliminate barriers to expanding broadband access in rural Virginia.

I stopped by Brentsville Day in Bristow to talk with the Daughters of the American Revolution.

I spoke with the New Kent Educational Foundation about my work to connect students with good paying jobs through CTE and STEM programs.

I had the pleasure of visiting Rappahannock Goodwill Industries to meet with their CEO, tour the facility, and learn more about their mission and services to folks in our area.

I heard from the firefighters at Stafford Local 4012 about ways Congress can continue to support our first responders.

I received the "Guardian of Seniors' Rights Award" from the 60 Plus Association for my commitment to protect Medicare and Social Security.

I met with the New Kent Chamber of Commerce for a business roundtable discussion to hear from business owners on how I can continue to be a voice for the polices that help our Virginia small businesses succeed.

I stopped by Proclaiming Grace Outreach to hear how they serve folks in New Kent and James City Counties through their food pantry and thrift shop.

I hosted a Hanover Veterans Forum at VFW Post 9808 to learn more about what issues First District veterans are experiencing and share some of the bills we've passed this Congress to expand and improve veterans' access to their hard-earned benefits.

I toured Anton-Paar USA Inc in Ashland to meet with employees, provide a Capitol Hill update, and hear how this Congress can continue working to alleviate the regulatory and compliance burden on businesses.

This month's press releases: 

Bipartisan, Bicameral Resolution Introduced to Celebrate Urban Wildlife Refuges

Wittman Votes to Fully Fund Military

Wittman Visits with Local Chambers of Commerce

Wittman Continues to Fight for Broadband Access at Fredericksburg Chamber Event

Wittman Statement on CBO Analysis of Public/Private Shipyards

Wittman Applauds Completion of First Funding Bills

Wittman Named "Hero of Main Street" 


This month's news clips:

Wittman shares legislative highlights with Williamsburg Chamber (Daily Press)

Wittman Votes to Fully Fund Military (Prince William Living)

At least 180 lawmakers voice support for federal pay raise as Congress goes to conference (Federal News Radio)

US Navy to launch force structure assessment (Defense News)

355-Ship Navy Will Mean Extending Vessels Past Planned Lifespans: Admiral (Military.com)

New Authorities Helping Navy Save Money on New Weapons; Sustainment Costs Still an Issue (USNI News)

Interview: Rep. Rob Wittman (Defense News)

At least 180 lawmakers voice support for federal pay raise as Congress goes to conference (Federal News Radio)

Editorial: Public shipyards are in dire need for a makeover (Virginian Pilot)

Lawmakers call on Trump to declare federal emergency (Virginia First)

Virginia Lawmakers Call on Trump to Declare Federal Emergency Ahead of Hurricane Florence (Townhall)

Vietnam veteran who's battled for VA benefits gets a respectful sendoff (Free Lance Star)

Wittman Statement on Completion of Appropriations Bills (Prince William Living)

New Navy Force Structure Assessment, 2018 Elections Could Change the Path to 355-Ship Fleet (USNI News)

I really enjoyed getting out in the community to interact with constituents regarding the issues most important to you. Please do not hesitate to contact me so I can best represent you.

Sincerely,

Rob

Offices

Hanover Office
6501 Mechanicsville Turnpike
Ste. 102
Mechanicsville, VA 23111
Phone: (804) 730-6595
Fax: (804) 730-6597

Stafford Office
95 Dunn Drive
Ste. 201
Stafford, VA 22556
Phone: (540) 659-2734
Fax: (540) 659-2737

Tappahannock Office
508 Church Lane
Tappahannock, VA 22560
Phone: (804) 443-0668
Fax: (804) 443-0671

Washington D.C. Office
2055 Rayburn H.O.B.
Washington, DC 20515
Phone: (202) 225-4261
Fax: (202) 225-4382

 


 


*Please do not reply to this email, as that mailbox is unattended. To better serve the constituents of the First District I have established a contact form on my website. Please click here if you would like to send additional correspondence
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Wednesday, October 3, 2018

six incredible candidates

American Possibilities
I'm going to cut right to it, Robert—

I'm asking you to chip in $3, right now, to help elect an incredible slate of Democrats running to become their state's attorney general.

If you've saved your payment information previously through Quick Donate, your donation will go through immediately.

Quick Donate: $25

Quick Donate: $50

Quick Donate: $100

Quick Donate: $250

Or donate another amount.

Let me say this as clearly as I can: This is one of the most important things I will write to you about between now and November 6. I mean it.

Just think of the trust we put in our states' attorneys general.

We ask them to keep our kids safe from abusers and human traffickers. To keep the worst of the worst off our streets.

And we ask them to root out corruption — so that ordinary folks can trust that America's elected officials work for the American people.

We've gotta be able to trust our attorneys general, Robert. We've got to.

So today, I'm endorsing a new slate of Democratic candidates for attorney general from across the country. Folks who embody the loftiest ideals of public service. Folks we can trust — all of them recommended by folks like you.

Meet them, then chip in $3 or more to American Possibilities to help elect them:

------
January Contreras, Arizona
January Contreras envisions an Arizona where everyone feels safe, where constitutional and civil rights are protected, and where the powerful no longer get away with playing by their own set of rules. From her work as the Deputy County Attorney for the Maricopa County Attorney's Office to her time as a criminal prosecutor, January earned a reputation for being tough and fair. As Assistant Attorney General, January brought justice to victims and their families in elder abuse and exploitation crimes, and prosecuted fraud, waste, and abuse in the healthcare system. She founded Arizona Legal Women and Youth Services (ALWAYS), a nonprofit that ensures children and young adult survivors of trauma, homelessness, and the foster care system have access to lawyers who will fight for them. January also led the charge to establish the Council on Combating Violence Against Women at the Department of Homeland Security. Previously, January served on the White House Council on Women and Girls, contributed to the development of the U.S. National Action Plan on Women, Peace, and Security, and volunteered on the Board of Directors of the Arizona Coalition to End Sexual and Domestic Violence. January is a proud fourth-generation Arizonan and the daughter of postal workers. January earned her undergraduate and law degrees from the University of Arizona in Tucson.

Steve Dettelbach, Ohio
Steve Dettelbach believes no one is above the law, no one is below the law and no one is beyond its reach. Born and raised in Ohio, Steve has stood before judges and juries to take on the tough cases and prosecute some of the worst criminals Ohio has ever seen. As a federal prosecutor for over two decades, Steve put child abusers, drug dealers, and human traffickers away, and he secured convictions against both Democrats and Republicans who broke the law. A husband and father of two, Steve launched his campaign for Ohio Attorney General in the summer of 2017 after traveling Ohio for months and visiting places as diverse as Cleveland's African American churches and Appalachia's union halls. He heard a very similar theme across these different communities — a belief that politicians have rigged the system to benefit themselves and powerful special interests, neglecting the real problems Ohioans face. Steve will work to fix this broken system as Ohio Attorney General by standing up to politicians in both parties and protecting Ohio from violent crime, and public corruption.

State Senator Aaron Ford, Nevada
Aaron has legal experience before our courts and administrative tribunals, as a law clerk, in private practice, and as an elected official. Before taking elected office, Aaron was a law clerk for two judges. In 2012, Aaron was elected to the Nevada State Senate. During his first legislative session, Aaron served as Chair of the Natural Resources Committee, Vice Chair of the Education Committee, and a member of the Judiciary Committee — and he was named "Rookie of the Year" by the Reno Gazette Journal,"Freshman of the Year" by the Las Vegas Review Journal, and "Senator of the Year" by the Nevada Conservation League. In the 2015 legislative session, Aaron led the fight against extreme policies that harmed working families as the State Senate's Minority Leader. In 2016, Aaron became Majority Leader and continued to pass legislation that kept Nevadans safe and strengthened the community. He passed legislation that combated elder abuse, increased transparency for big pharmaceutical companies, reduced recidivism and criminal-justice costs through improved educational, mental health and substance-abuse programs, and increased penalties for criminals who target our brave first responders.

Josh Kaul, Wisconsin
As a federal prosecutor in Baltimore, Josh worked closely with law enforcement on complex investigations and prosecuted murderers, gang members, and drug traffickers. When Josh returned to Wisconsin with his family, he took on a new challenge: protecting the right to vote. Josh has gone to court and fought against laws passed by the state legislature that restrict access to the ballot box. Josh was raised in Wisconsin by his mother, who was a prosecutor, and his stepfather, who was a police officer. He studied history and economics at Yale, where he met his wife, Lindsey and graduated with honors. Josh then attended Stanford Law School, where he served as President of the Stanford Law Review. Josh began his legal career as a law clerk to Judge Michael Boudin, who was then the Chief Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit. After his clerkship, Josh worked for Jenner & Block in Washington, D.C. Josh and Lindsey are the proud parents of two young boys, Simon and Henry.

Dana Nessel, Michigan
Dana began her legal career as an Assistant Prosecutor in the Wayne County Prosecutor's Office. For over a decade, she was assigned to a number of elite units within the office and handled some of Wayne County's most difficult cases. After leaving the Prosecutor's Office, Dana continued to vigorously defend the rights of indigent defendants on hundreds of criminal cases, from petty theft to first-degree murder. She is also recognized as one of the premier litigators of LGBTQ issues in Michigan. In 2010, she brought the matter of Harmon v. Davis, in which a Michigan court, for the first time, held that a non-biological parent in a same-sex couple could establish custodial rights to the couple's children. Dana spearheaded the precedent-setting case, DeBoer v. Snyder, which challenged the bans on adoption and marriage for same-sex couples in Michigan and was later consolidated with its affiliated U.S. Sixth Circuit cases into Obergefell v. Hodges in the United States Supreme Court. She is the President and founder of the Fair Michigan Foundation, and helped create the Fair Michigan Justice Project, a first of its kind task force which investigates and prosecutes hate crimes committed against the LGBTQ community. Dana lives in southeast Michigan with her wife, Alanna Maguire, their twin sons, Alex and Zach, along with various cats.

Phil Weiser, Colorado
After graduating law school, Phil worked in Denver for Judge David Ebel on the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals, then went on to serve as a law clerk at the United States Supreme Court for Justices Byron White and Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Phil served in President Clinton's Department of Justice's Antitrust Division before returning to teach as a professor at the University of Colorado Law School. There, he founded the Silicon Flatirons Center for Law, Technology, and Entrepreneurship, litigated civil rights cases, co-chaired Governor Bill Ritter's Innovation Council, and served on President Obama's Transition Team, overseeing the Federal Trade Commission. He served in the Obama Administration as a Deputy Assistant Attorney General in the U.S. Department of Justice, where he oversaw complex antitrust investigations, worked to strengthen the review of anticompetitive mergers, and spearheaded an effort to promote competition in agriculture. Phil also served President Obama in the White House as Senior Advisor for Technology and Innovation at the National Economic Council, spearheading what became a bipartisan effort to increase access to wireless spectrum and enable the deployment of an interoperable wireless broadband network for public safety. After returning to Colorado, Phil led the University of Colorado Law School as its Dean from 2011-16, where he held tuition steady and more than doubled student scholarships. He continues to serve as CU's Hatfield Professor of Law and Telecommunications, and Executive Director of the Silicon Flatirons Center for Law, Technology, and Entrepreneurship at the University of Colorado. Phil and his wife Heidi, a physician, live in Denver, where they are raising their two children, Aviva and Sammy.

-----

I don't know about you. But if we elect folks like January, Steve, Aaron, Josh, Dana, and Phil, I'll sleep a little better at night this November.

And Robert? Making it happen is on us. Electing these attorney general candidates this fall won't happen because we want it to, and it certainly won't happen if we buy into all this nonsense about a "blue wave" being inevitable.

To elect these incredible candidates, it'll take folks from places like Yorktown, chipping in $3 at a time, until we get this done. It's that simple:

https://go.americanpossibilities.org/ag-candidates

Thanks for listening. And thanks for chipping in.

—Joe
Website
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Contributions or gifts to American Possibilities are not tax deductible.

  Paid for by American Possibilities and not authorized by any candidate or candidate’s committee.  


© 2018 American Possibilities. All Rights Reserved.
918 Pennsylvania Ave SE, Washington DC 20003

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six incredible candidates

American Possibilities
I'm going to cut right to it, DianeA—

I'm asking you to chip in $3, right now, to help elect an incredible slate of Democrats running to become their state's attorney general.

If you've saved your payment information previously through Quick Donate, your donation will go through immediately.

Quick Donate: $25

Quick Donate: $50

Quick Donate: $100

Quick Donate: $250

Or donate another amount.

Let me say this as clearly as I can: This is one of the most important things I will write to you about between now and November 6. I mean it.

Just think of the trust we put in our states' attorneys general.

We ask them to keep our kids safe from abusers and human traffickers. To keep the worst of the worst off our streets.

And we ask them to root out corruption — so that ordinary folks can trust that America's elected officials work for the American people.

We've gotta be able to trust our attorneys general, DianeA. We've got to.

So today, I'm endorsing a new slate of Democratic candidates for attorney general from across the country. Folks who embody the loftiest ideals of public service. Folks we can trust — all of them recommended by folks like you.

Meet them, then chip in $3 or more to American Possibilities to help elect them:

------
January Contreras, Arizona
January Contreras envisions an Arizona where everyone feels safe, where constitutional and civil rights are protected, and where the powerful no longer get away with playing by their own set of rules. From her work as the Deputy County Attorney for the Maricopa County Attorney's Office to her time as a criminal prosecutor, January earned a reputation for being tough and fair. As Assistant Attorney General, January brought justice to victims and their families in elder abuse and exploitation crimes, and prosecuted fraud, waste, and abuse in the healthcare system. She founded Arizona Legal Women and Youth Services (ALWAYS), a nonprofit that ensures children and young adult survivors of trauma, homelessness, and the foster care system have access to lawyers who will fight for them. January also led the charge to establish the Council on Combating Violence Against Women at the Department of Homeland Security. Previously, January served on the White House Council on Women and Girls, contributed to the development of the U.S. National Action Plan on Women, Peace, and Security, and volunteered on the Board of Directors of the Arizona Coalition to End Sexual and Domestic Violence. January is a proud fourth-generation Arizonan and the daughter of postal workers. January earned her undergraduate and law degrees from the University of Arizona in Tucson.

Steve Dettelbach, Ohio
Steve Dettelbach believes no one is above the law, no one is below the law and no one is beyond its reach. Born and raised in Ohio, Steve has stood before judges and juries to take on the tough cases and prosecute some of the worst criminals Ohio has ever seen. As a federal prosecutor for over two decades, Steve put child abusers, drug dealers, and human traffickers away, and he secured convictions against both Democrats and Republicans who broke the law. A husband and father of two, Steve launched his campaign for Ohio Attorney General in the summer of 2017 after traveling Ohio for months and visiting places as diverse as Cleveland's African American churches and Appalachia's union halls. He heard a very similar theme across these different communities — a belief that politicians have rigged the system to benefit themselves and powerful special interests, neglecting the real problems Ohioans face. Steve will work to fix this broken system as Ohio Attorney General by standing up to politicians in both parties and protecting Ohio from violent crime, and public corruption.

State Senator Aaron Ford, Nevada
Aaron has legal experience before our courts and administrative tribunals, as a law clerk, in private practice, and as an elected official. Before taking elected office, Aaron was a law clerk for two judges. In 2012, Aaron was elected to the Nevada State Senate. During his first legislative session, Aaron served as Chair of the Natural Resources Committee, Vice Chair of the Education Committee, and a member of the Judiciary Committee — and he was named "Rookie of the Year" by the Reno Gazette Journal,"Freshman of the Year" by the Las Vegas Review Journal, and "Senator of the Year" by the Nevada Conservation League. In the 2015 legislative session, Aaron led the fight against extreme policies that harmed working families as the State Senate's Minority Leader. In 2016, Aaron became Majority Leader and continued to pass legislation that kept Nevadans safe and strengthened the community. He passed legislation that combated elder abuse, increased transparency for big pharmaceutical companies, reduced recidivism and criminal-justice costs through improved educational, mental health and substance-abuse programs, and increased penalties for criminals who target our brave first responders.

Josh Kaul, Wisconsin
As a federal prosecutor in Baltimore, Josh worked closely with law enforcement on complex investigations and prosecuted murderers, gang members, and drug traffickers. When Josh returned to Wisconsin with his family, he took on a new challenge: protecting the right to vote. Josh has gone to court and fought against laws passed by the state legislature that restrict access to the ballot box. Josh was raised in Wisconsin by his mother, who was a prosecutor, and his stepfather, who was a police officer. He studied history and economics at Yale, where he met his wife, Lindsey and graduated with honors. Josh then attended Stanford Law School, where he served as President of the Stanford Law Review. Josh began his legal career as a law clerk to Judge Michael Boudin, who was then the Chief Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit. After his clerkship, Josh worked for Jenner & Block in Washington, D.C. Josh and Lindsey are the proud parents of two young boys, Simon and Henry.

Dana Nessel, Michigan
Dana began her legal career as an Assistant Prosecutor in the Wayne County Prosecutor's Office. For over a decade, she was assigned to a number of elite units within the office and handled some of Wayne County's most difficult cases. After leaving the Prosecutor's Office, Dana continued to vigorously defend the rights of indigent defendants on hundreds of criminal cases, from petty theft to first-degree murder. She is also recognized as one of the premier litigators of LGBTQ issues in Michigan. In 2010, she brought the matter of Harmon v. Davis, in which a Michigan court, for the first time, held that a non-biological parent in a same-sex couple could establish custodial rights to the couple's children. Dana spearheaded the precedent-setting case, DeBoer v. Snyder, which challenged the bans on adoption and marriage for same-sex couples in Michigan and was later consolidated with its affiliated U.S. Sixth Circuit cases into Obergefell v. Hodges in the United States Supreme Court. She is the President and founder of the Fair Michigan Foundation, and helped create the Fair Michigan Justice Project, a first of its kind task force which investigates and prosecutes hate crimes committed against the LGBTQ community. Dana lives in southeast Michigan with her wife, Alanna Maguire, their twin sons, Alex and Zach, along with various cats.

Phil Weiser, Colorado
After graduating law school, Phil worked in Denver for Judge David Ebel on the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals, then went on to serve as a law clerk at the United States Supreme Court for Justices Byron White and Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Phil served in President Clinton's Department of Justice's Antitrust Division before returning to teach as a professor at the University of Colorado Law School. There, he founded the Silicon Flatirons Center for Law, Technology, and Entrepreneurship, litigated civil rights cases, co-chaired Governor Bill Ritter's Innovation Council, and served on President Obama's Transition Team, overseeing the Federal Trade Commission. He served in the Obama Administration as a Deputy Assistant Attorney General in the U.S. Department of Justice, where he oversaw complex antitrust investigations, worked to strengthen the review of anticompetitive mergers, and spearheaded an effort to promote competition in agriculture. Phil also served President Obama in the White House as Senior Advisor for Technology and Innovation at the National Economic Council, spearheading what became a bipartisan effort to increase access to wireless spectrum and enable the deployment of an interoperable wireless broadband network for public safety. After returning to Colorado, Phil led the University of Colorado Law School as its Dean from 2011-16, where he held tuition steady and more than doubled student scholarships. He continues to serve as CU's Hatfield Professor of Law and Telecommunications, and Executive Director of the Silicon Flatirons Center for Law, Technology, and Entrepreneurship at the University of Colorado. Phil and his wife Heidi, a physician, live in Denver, where they are raising their two children, Aviva and Sammy.

-----

I don't know about you. But if we elect folks like January, Steve, Aaron, Josh, Dana, and Phil, I'll sleep a little better at night this November.

And DianeA? Making it happen is on us. Electing these attorney general candidates this fall won't happen because we want it to, and it certainly won't happen if we buy into all this nonsense about a "blue wave" being inevitable.

To elect these incredible candidates, it'll take folks from places like Montross, chipping in $3 at a time, until we get this done. It's that simple:

https://go.americanpossibilities.org/ag-candidates

Thanks for listening. And thanks for chipping in.

—Joe
Website
fb tw
Donate
Contributions or gifts to American Possibilities are not tax deductible.

  Paid for by American Possibilities and not authorized by any candidate or candidate’s committee.  


© 2018 American Possibilities. All Rights Reserved.
918 Pennsylvania Ave SE, Washington DC 20003

Privacy Policy  |  Terms of Service  |  Unsubscribe

six incredible candidates

American Possibilities
I'm going to cut right to it, Robert—

I'm asking you to chip in $3, right now, to help elect an incredible slate of Democrats running to become their state's attorney general.

If you've saved your payment information previously through Quick Donate, your donation will go through immediately.

Quick Donate: $25

Quick Donate: $50

Quick Donate: $100

Quick Donate: $250

Or donate another amount.

Let me say this as clearly as I can: This is one of the most important things I will write to you about between now and November 6. I mean it.

Just think of the trust we put in our states' attorneys general.

We ask them to keep our kids safe from abusers and human traffickers. To keep the worst of the worst off our streets.

And we ask them to root out corruption — so that ordinary folks can trust that America's elected officials work for the American people.

We've gotta be able to trust our attorneys general, Robert. We've got to.

So today, I'm endorsing a new slate of Democratic candidates for attorney general from across the country. Folks who embody the loftiest ideals of public service. Folks we can trust — all of them recommended by folks like you.

Meet them, then chip in $3 or more to American Possibilities to help elect them:

------
January Contreras, Arizona
January Contreras envisions an Arizona where everyone feels safe, where constitutional and civil rights are protected, and where the powerful no longer get away with playing by their own set of rules. From her work as the Deputy County Attorney for the Maricopa County Attorney's Office to her time as a criminal prosecutor, January earned a reputation for being tough and fair. As Assistant Attorney General, January brought justice to victims and their families in elder abuse and exploitation crimes, and prosecuted fraud, waste, and abuse in the healthcare system. She founded Arizona Legal Women and Youth Services (ALWAYS), a nonprofit that ensures children and young adult survivors of trauma, homelessness, and the foster care system have access to lawyers who will fight for them. January also led the charge to establish the Council on Combating Violence Against Women at the Department of Homeland Security. Previously, January served on the White House Council on Women and Girls, contributed to the development of the U.S. National Action Plan on Women, Peace, and Security, and volunteered on the Board of Directors of the Arizona Coalition to End Sexual and Domestic Violence. January is a proud fourth-generation Arizonan and the daughter of postal workers. January earned her undergraduate and law degrees from the University of Arizona in Tucson.

Steve Dettelbach, Ohio
Steve Dettelbach believes no one is above the law, no one is below the law and no one is beyond its reach. Born and raised in Ohio, Steve has stood before judges and juries to take on the tough cases and prosecute some of the worst criminals Ohio has ever seen. As a federal prosecutor for over two decades, Steve put child abusers, drug dealers, and human traffickers away, and he secured convictions against both Democrats and Republicans who broke the law. A husband and father of two, Steve launched his campaign for Ohio Attorney General in the summer of 2017 after traveling Ohio for months and visiting places as diverse as Cleveland's African American churches and Appalachia's union halls. He heard a very similar theme across these different communities — a belief that politicians have rigged the system to benefit themselves and powerful special interests, neglecting the real problems Ohioans face. Steve will work to fix this broken system as Ohio Attorney General by standing up to politicians in both parties and protecting Ohio from violent crime, and public corruption.

State Senator Aaron Ford, Nevada
Aaron has legal experience before our courts and administrative tribunals, as a law clerk, in private practice, and as an elected official. Before taking elected office, Aaron was a law clerk for two judges. In 2012, Aaron was elected to the Nevada State Senate. During his first legislative session, Aaron served as Chair of the Natural Resources Committee, Vice Chair of the Education Committee, and a member of the Judiciary Committee — and he was named "Rookie of the Year" by the Reno Gazette Journal,"Freshman of the Year" by the Las Vegas Review Journal, and "Senator of the Year" by the Nevada Conservation League. In the 2015 legislative session, Aaron led the fight against extreme policies that harmed working families as the State Senate's Minority Leader. In 2016, Aaron became Majority Leader and continued to pass legislation that kept Nevadans safe and strengthened the community. He passed legislation that combated elder abuse, increased transparency for big pharmaceutical companies, reduced recidivism and criminal-justice costs through improved educational, mental health and substance-abuse programs, and increased penalties for criminals who target our brave first responders.

Josh Kaul, Wisconsin
As a federal prosecutor in Baltimore, Josh worked closely with law enforcement on complex investigations and prosecuted murderers, gang members, and drug traffickers. When Josh returned to Wisconsin with his family, he took on a new challenge: protecting the right to vote. Josh has gone to court and fought against laws passed by the state legislature that restrict access to the ballot box. Josh was raised in Wisconsin by his mother, who was a prosecutor, and his stepfather, who was a police officer. He studied history and economics at Yale, where he met his wife, Lindsey and graduated with honors. Josh then attended Stanford Law School, where he served as President of the Stanford Law Review. Josh began his legal career as a law clerk to Judge Michael Boudin, who was then the Chief Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit. After his clerkship, Josh worked for Jenner & Block in Washington, D.C. Josh and Lindsey are the proud parents of two young boys, Simon and Henry.

Dana Nessel, Michigan
Dana began her legal career as an Assistant Prosecutor in the Wayne County Prosecutor's Office. For over a decade, she was assigned to a number of elite units within the office and handled some of Wayne County's most difficult cases. After leaving the Prosecutor's Office, Dana continued to vigorously defend the rights of indigent defendants on hundreds of criminal cases, from petty theft to first-degree murder. She is also recognized as one of the premier litigators of LGBTQ issues in Michigan. In 2010, she brought the matter of Harmon v. Davis, in which a Michigan court, for the first time, held that a non-biological parent in a same-sex couple could establish custodial rights to the couple's children. Dana spearheaded the precedent-setting case, DeBoer v. Snyder, which challenged the bans on adoption and marriage for same-sex couples in Michigan and was later consolidated with its affiliated U.S. Sixth Circuit cases into Obergefell v. Hodges in the United States Supreme Court. She is the President and founder of the Fair Michigan Foundation, and helped create the Fair Michigan Justice Project, a first of its kind task force which investigates and prosecutes hate crimes committed against the LGBTQ community. Dana lives in southeast Michigan with her wife, Alanna Maguire, their twin sons, Alex and Zach, along with various cats.

Phil Weiser, Colorado
After graduating law school, Phil worked in Denver for Judge David Ebel on the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals, then went on to serve as a law clerk at the United States Supreme Court for Justices Byron White and Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Phil served in President Clinton's Department of Justice's Antitrust Division before returning to teach as a professor at the University of Colorado Law School. There, he founded the Silicon Flatirons Center for Law, Technology, and Entrepreneurship, litigated civil rights cases, co-chaired Governor Bill Ritter's Innovation Council, and served on President Obama's Transition Team, overseeing the Federal Trade Commission. He served in the Obama Administration as a Deputy Assistant Attorney General in the U.S. Department of Justice, where he oversaw complex antitrust investigations, worked to strengthen the review of anticompetitive mergers, and spearheaded an effort to promote competition in agriculture. Phil also served President Obama in the White House as Senior Advisor for Technology and Innovation at the National Economic Council, spearheading what became a bipartisan effort to increase access to wireless spectrum and enable the deployment of an interoperable wireless broadband network for public safety. After returning to Colorado, Phil led the University of Colorado Law School as its Dean from 2011-16, where he held tuition steady and more than doubled student scholarships. He continues to serve as CU's Hatfield Professor of Law and Telecommunications, and Executive Director of the Silicon Flatirons Center for Law, Technology, and Entrepreneurship at the University of Colorado. Phil and his wife Heidi, a physician, live in Denver, where they are raising their two children, Aviva and Sammy.

-----

I don't know about you. But if we elect folks like January, Steve, Aaron, Josh, Dana, and Phil, I'll sleep a little better at night this November.

And Robert? Making it happen is on us. Electing these attorney general candidates this fall won't happen because we want it to, and it certainly won't happen if we buy into all this nonsense about a "blue wave" being inevitable.

To elect these incredible candidates, it'll take folks from places like Yorktown, chipping in $3 at a time, until we get this done. It's that simple:

https://go.americanpossibilities.org/ag-candidates

Thanks for listening. And thanks for chipping in.

—Joe
Website
fb tw
Donate
Contributions or gifts to American Possibilities are not tax deductible.

  Paid for by American Possibilities and not authorized by any candidate or candidate’s committee.  


© 2018 American Possibilities. All Rights Reserved.
918 Pennsylvania Ave SE, Washington DC 20003

Privacy Policy  |  Terms of Service  |  Unsubscribe

trust

American Possibilities
I'm going to cut right to it, Robert—

I'm asking you to chip in $3, right now, to help elect an incredible slate of Democrats running to become their state's attorney general.

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Let me say this as clearly as I can: This is one of the most important things I will write to you about between now and November 6. I mean it.

Just think of the trust we put in our states' attorneys general.

We ask them to keep our kids safe from abusers and human traffickers. To keep the worst of the worst off our streets.

And we ask them to root out corruption — so that ordinary folks can trust that America's elected officials work for the American people.

We've gotta be able to trust our attorneys general, Robert. We've got to.

So today, I'm endorsing a new slate of Democratic candidates for attorney general from across the country. Folks who embody the loftiest ideals of public service. Folks we can trust — all of them recommended by folks like you.

Meet them, then chip in $3 or more to American Possibilities to help elect them:

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January Contreras, Arizona
January Contreras envisions an Arizona where everyone feels safe, where constitutional and civil rights are protected, and where the powerful no longer get away with playing by their own set of rules. From her work as the Deputy County Attorney for the Maricopa County Attorney's Office to her time as a criminal prosecutor, January earned a reputation for being tough and fair. As Assistant Attorney General, January brought justice to victims and their families in elder abuse and exploitation crimes, and prosecuted fraud, waste, and abuse in the healthcare system. She founded Arizona Legal Women and Youth Services (ALWAYS), a nonprofit that ensures children and young adult survivors of trauma, homelessness, and the foster care system have access to lawyers who will fight for them. January also led the charge to establish the Council on Combating Violence Against Women at the Department of Homeland Security. Previously, January served on the White House Council on Women and Girls, contributed to the development of the U.S. National Action Plan on Women, Peace, and Security, and volunteered on the Board of Directors of the Arizona Coalition to End Sexual and Domestic Violence. January is a proud fourth-generation Arizonan and the daughter of postal workers. January earned her undergraduate and law degrees from the University of Arizona in Tucson.

Steve Dettelbach, Ohio
Steve Dettelbach believes no one is above the law, no one is below the law and no one is beyond its reach. Born and raised in Ohio, Steve has stood before judges and juries to take on the tough cases and prosecute some of the worst criminals Ohio has ever seen. As a federal prosecutor for over two decades, Steve put child abusers, drug dealers, and human traffickers away, and he secured convictions against both Democrats and Republicans who broke the law. A husband and father of two, Steve launched his campaign for Ohio Attorney General in the summer of 2017 after traveling Ohio for months and visiting places as diverse as Cleveland's African American churches and Appalachia's union halls. He heard a very similar theme across these different communities — a belief that politicians have rigged the system to benefit themselves and powerful special interests, neglecting the real problems Ohioans face. Steve will work to fix this broken system as Ohio Attorney General by standing up to politicians in both parties and protecting Ohio from violent crime, and public corruption.

State Senator Aaron Ford, Nevada
Aaron has legal experience before our courts and administrative tribunals, as a law clerk, in private practice, and as an elected official. Before taking elected office, Aaron was a law clerk for two judges. In 2012, Aaron was elected to the Nevada State Senate. During his first legislative session, Aaron served as Chair of the Natural Resources Committee, Vice Chair of the Education Committee, and a member of the Judiciary Committee — and he was named "Rookie of the Year" by the Reno Gazette Journal,"Freshman of the Year" by the Las Vegas Review Journal, and "Senator of the Year" by the Nevada Conservation League. In the 2015 legislative session, Aaron led the fight against extreme policies that harmed working families as the State Senate's Minority Leader. In 2016, Aaron became Majority Leader and continued to pass legislation that kept Nevadans safe and strengthened the community. He passed legislation that combated elder abuse, increased transparency for big pharmaceutical companies, reduced recidivism and criminal-justice costs through improved educational, mental health and substance-abuse programs, and increased penalties for criminals who target our brave first responders.

Josh Kaul, Wisconsin
As a federal prosecutor in Baltimore, Josh worked closely with law enforcement on complex investigations and prosecuted murderers, gang members, and drug traffickers. When Josh returned to Wisconsin with his family, he took on a new challenge: protecting the right to vote. Josh has gone to court and fought against laws passed by the state legislature that restrict access to the ballot box. Josh was raised in Wisconsin by his mother, who was a prosecutor, and his stepfather, who was a police officer. He studied history and economics at Yale, where he met his wife, Lindsey and graduated with honors. Josh then attended Stanford Law School, where he served as President of the Stanford Law Review. Josh began his legal career as a law clerk to Judge Michael Boudin, who was then the Chief Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit. After his clerkship, Josh worked for Jenner & Block in Washington, D.C. Josh and Lindsey are the proud parents of two young boys, Simon and Henry.

Dana Nessel, Michigan
Dana began her legal career as an Assistant Prosecutor in the Wayne County Prosecutor's Office. For over a decade, she was assigned to a number of elite units within the office and handled some of Wayne County's most difficult cases. After leaving the Prosecutor's Office, Dana continued to vigorously defend the rights of indigent defendants on hundreds of criminal cases, from petty theft to first-degree murder. She is also recognized as one of the premier litigators of LGBTQ issues in Michigan. In 2010, she brought the matter of Harmon v. Davis, in which a Michigan court, for the first time, held that a non-biological parent in a same-sex couple could establish custodial rights to the couple's children. Dana spearheaded the precedent-setting case, DeBoer v. Snyder, which challenged the bans on adoption and marriage for same-sex couples in Michigan and was later consolidated with its affiliated U.S. Sixth Circuit cases into Obergefell v. Hodges in the United States Supreme Court. She is the President and founder of the Fair Michigan Foundation, and helped create the Fair Michigan Justice Project, a first of its kind task force which investigates and prosecutes hate crimes committed against the LGBTQ community. Dana lives in southeast Michigan with her wife, Alanna Maguire, their twin sons, Alex and Zach, along with various cats.

Phil Weiser, Colorado
After graduating law school, Phil worked in Denver for Judge David Ebel on the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals, then went on to serve as a law clerk at the United States Supreme Court for Justices Byron White and Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Phil served in President Clinton's Department of Justice's Antitrust Division before returning to teach as a professor at the University of Colorado Law School. There, he founded the Silicon Flatirons Center for Law, Technology, and Entrepreneurship, litigated civil rights cases, co-chaired Governor Bill Ritter's Innovation Council, and served on President Obama's Transition Team, overseeing the Federal Trade Commission. He served in the Obama Administration as a Deputy Assistant Attorney General in the U.S. Department of Justice, where he oversaw complex antitrust investigations, worked to strengthen the review of anticompetitive mergers, and spearheaded an effort to promote competition in agriculture. Phil also served President Obama in the White House as Senior Advisor for Technology and Innovation at the National Economic Council, spearheading what became a bipartisan effort to increase access to wireless spectrum and enable the deployment of an interoperable wireless broadband network for public safety. After returning to Colorado, Phil led the University of Colorado Law School as its Dean from 2011-16, where he held tuition steady and more than doubled student scholarships. He continues to serve as CU's Hatfield Professor of Law and Telecommunications, and Executive Director of the Silicon Flatirons Center for Law, Technology, and Entrepreneurship at the University of Colorado. Phil and his wife Heidi, a physician, live in Denver, where they are raising their two children, Aviva and Sammy.

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I don't know about you. But if we elect folks like January, Steve, Aaron, Josh, Dana, and Phil, I'll sleep a little better at night this November.

And Robert? Making it happen is on us. Electing these attorney general candidates this fall won't happen because we want it to, and it certainly won't happen if we buy into all this nonsense about a "blue wave" being inevitable.

To elect these incredible candidates, it'll take folks from places like Yorktown, chipping in $3 at a time, until we get this done. It's that simple:

https://go.americanpossibilities.org/ag-candidates

Thanks for listening. And thanks for chipping in.

—Joe
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